Tag Archives: Pyongyang

30Aug/15

North Korea favourites – thoughts of a North Korean tour guide

YPT’s very own Chris Kelly weighs in on his favourite things to do and see in Pyongyang.

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Building in North Korea – Tower of the Juche Idea

It surprises me to hear customers commonly ask, “Aren’t you bored of returning to the same places in Pyongyang?”  The answer is honestly, a resounding no!  Regardless of how many times I have donned my suit to pay a visit to the Kumsusan Palace of the Sun, walked up the steps and past the bronze busts at the Revolutionary Martyr’s Cemetery, learned about the ‘handsome’ vase at the Koryo Museum, or singing along to ‘Pangapsumnida’ as the sweet sound of the accordion fills the room at the lamb barbecue restaurant, I have never, ever felt bored in the DPRK.  But there is one place that excites me more than all others and on a good, clear day it could even be my favorite place in the whole world.  That place is the Tower of the Juche Idea.

When I travel to a new city, I am partial to a good view and even before I first traveled to north Korea, I was unashamedly excited to visit the Tower of the Juche Idea.  Due to a number of reasons, many viewing platforms across the world incredibly disappoint.  But the long queues, exorbitant entrance fees, crowds of people on the platform, and unnecessary obstructions that plague other viewing points, do not do so here.  With quick access, a lack of other tourists, a chest height stone wall separating you with the city, and with an entrance fee of just 5 Euro, the Tower of the Juche Idea does not suffer from the same drawbacks that buildings such as the Empire State Building and the Shanghai Tower do.

There is something spectacular about the city of Pyongyang and it is only by standing at the top of the Tower of the Juche Idea and taking in a panoramic view of the city that one can truly realize just how aesthetically beautiful it is.  One second you are looking at canoeists in the Taedong River whilst a slight glance to the left might see preparations under way for a mass rally at Kim Il Sung Square.  Take another look and you will see the May Day Stadium and a close inspection to the right will bring you to the colorful communist era housing blocks in East Pyongyang.

I do not exaggerate when I say I could spend hours standing at the top, leaning over the stone wall and observing the people of Pyongyang cycling by on their bikes, fishing at the banks of the river, queuing for buses, or simply chatting with friends.  In any other city, it might not make for interesting viewing but this is Pyongyang, where simply everything is interesting.

Activity in North Korea –  Munsu Water Park

Bar none, the greatest place to have non-alcoholic (recommended, not enforced) fun in Pyongyang!  One of the most interesting experiences I had here occurred after the Pyongyang Marathon in April 2014, when, after foolishly ignoring the attendants advise not to do so, I went down the pink slide and ultimately ended up with a face full of blood and five badass looking stitches.  On most occasions though, a trip to the water park has proven to be nothing more than just good wholesome fun and (no doubt to the chagrin of the western media who portray such places as being only for the ‘super elite’ ) it’s is full of local North Korean people from Pyongyang and beyond.

The indoor part of the park consists of a trampoline area, a rock climbing wall, badminton courts, lane pools, and water slides.  One of the most interesting things about the water park is getting to see the latest trends in the North Korea swimwear market and, without getting too crude, lets just say people are often surprised that the ladies of North Korea are not quite as conservatively dressed as they may have originally believed.

During the summer months, the outdoor section of the park opens for business and it really is an sight to behold.  There is something quite extraordinary about standing with a yellow inflatable raft on steps leading to a water slide, whilst chatting to a young North Korean English student from Nampho, and concurrently catching a glimpse of the magnificent Ryugyong Hotel looming over the entire city.  In Pyongyang, ordinary things become extraordinary, simply by virtue of their existence.  Munsu Water Park is one of these things.

If I could pass on one tip it would be to refrain from climbing to the highest platform in the diving area unless you are confident you will descend in a manner other than the stairs; the North Koreans will form a crowd to watch you and they will be extremely disappointed if you chicken out!

northkoreaarmyRestaurant in North Korea – Train’s Restaurant Car

I’m not sure if this is cheating because it doesn’t have a name and its not stationary but who says that should be part of the rules anyway!  But honestly, my favorite restaurant in North Korea is the restaurant car on the train from Sinuiju to Pyongyang.  Although I think the food is very tasty, It takes a lot more than just that to enjoy a dining experience.  In the restaurant car, whether it be from our customers embarking on a first time trip to North Korea, North Koreans from Sinuiju visiting Pyongyang, or Pyongyangites returning home, a constant clinking of soju glasses and chorus of laughter run continually through the carriage.  On the occasions when the windows are open and the weather is nice, there is no finer feeling than rambling your way on a train through the North Korean countryside, sipping ice cold beer and enjoying conversations with new friends as the gentle breeze sweeps into the carriage.  Truly delightful!

Experience in North Korea – Marathon

There are some experiences that will live with a person forever and if for some reason, my taking part in the Pyongyang Marathon happens to fade from my memory, I highly doubt anything else will remain.  Truly, it was not only my greatest experience in North Korea, but without question my greatest experience in life.  Having the freedom to run the streets of Pyongyang whilst high fiving local Pyongangites standing by the side of the road and returning waves from those standing on their apartment balconies may not sound like much to some, but try telling that to any of the hundreds of foreigners who took part in the Marathon.  After completing the race inside a packed Kim Il Sung Square, I witnessed and comforted people so overcome with emotion that they could do nothing but remain speechless.  Afterwards, finding each superlative falling short, people found it impossible to conjure up their true emotions.  I too am still searching for the right words.

29Aug/15

Sports in North Korea

Every June, Young Pioneer Tours holds a Sporting Interest Tour to combine two of the greatest things this world has to offer – Sports, and a trip to the DPRK.

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In the spirit of all things World Cup, Young Pioneer Tours, last June took a group of eight people to Pyongyang to play a friendly game of football against local Koreans.

We played the match on Friday morning and although Messi was replaced by Kim, and Pak took the place of Neymar, enough skill and excitement was created to keep the spectators enthralled.  Whilst the DPRK team was made up entirely of Koreans (including the former goalkeeper for the DPRK national team), the international team consisted of players from Germany, Ireland, Scotland, Hong Kong, France and DPRK.

Although the main purpose of the trip was this football match, it was by no means the only highlight.  In addition topyongyangshoot1 this match which is explained in detail below, we also watched a cup game at Kim Il Sung Stadium between Wilmido and Sonbong, fired live rounds at the Meari Shooting Range, drank with Pyongyangites at the Gyonghung Beer Bar, rode roller coasters at the amusement park, and swam with locals at Munsu Water Park.  As action-packed as this sounds we also visited all of the major sites in and around Pyongyang and took a trip down to the DMZ to view the most heavily fortified border in the world and have pictures taken with soldiers from the Korean People’s Army.

“Having arrived in Pyongyang four days before the actual match, our team was certainly not in prime physical condition for the game.  Anyone who has traveled with YPT knows that we like an evening drink or two, something that doesn’t really go hand in hand with excelling at sports.”

sporting-tourThe game started off rather bad for us, much to the joy of the Korean onlookers.  After about ten minutes we were two-nil down.  Perhaps due to the jests from the other team that we should’ve gone easy on the soju the previous night, the YPT team rallied back to bring it to two-two.  Everyone likes a good comeback so even those on the sidelines applauded our determination.  Invigorated by our new fan club, the international team through sublime passing and skill, went on to take the lead.  Half time was fast approaching and our team was confident of entering the break with at least a one goal margin.  This confidence manifested itself as laziness and after two quick goals from the DPRK team we entered half time trailing by a goal.

“During the half time talk, we rued our soju infused bowling escapades the night before but realizing that now was not the time for self-pity, we rallied and planned new tactics.”

Confident of regaining our short lived lead, we emerged to the pitch full of hope.  This hope turned out to be asIMG_75578 fleeting as our one goal advantage and we quickly we found ourselves five – two down.  Changes were made and again the pendulum of fortune swung in our favor as we quickly pulled the game back to five – five.  Our fan club which appeared to disband at five – two down had by now firmly re-established itself.  Alas their support, perfidious as it was, was not enough to allow us to go onto win the game.  After a few near-misses and wayward passes from our side, the DPRK team capitalized and managed to squeeze in a further two goals to end the game seven – five.

After some post match handshakes and photographs, we told them to take good care of the trophy as we would be back to reclaim it in 2015!

29Aug/15

Pyongyang Marathon – An Indescribable Experience

Around 700 foreign runners awoke on the 12th of April knowing that they were about to experience something incredible.

The vast majority had previously taken part in marathon pyongyang-marathonevents but undoubtedly there was something special about taking part in the Pyongyang Marathon.  After a feast of a breakfast in the hotel banquet room that included everything from apples to Chinese soup to fried pork, the runners departed the Yanggakdo Hotel and made their way by bus to the imposing Kim Il Sung Stadium.  By the time the runners arrived, the 50,000 capacity crowd had already begun to file in an orderly manner into the stadium to watch not just the marathon event, but all the subsidiary entertainment put on in celebration of the 103rd anniversary of the birth of President Kim Il Sung.

After around twenty minutes of warming up outside the stadium (and under the watchful eyes of General Kim Jong Il and President Kim Il Sung), the marathon, half marathon and 10km runners were permitted to enter and, as one competitor remarked to me at the time, the feeling of entering Kim Il Sung Stadium with the capacity crowd chanting, clapping, singing, and cheering was one that was not likely to ever be forgotten.

Assembling on the football pitch inside the stadium, some of the more focused runners managed to continue warm ups but for the vast majority, simply glancing around the stadium at 50,000 North Koreans eradicated any ability to warm up and, notwithstanding the odd picture or two, allowed only for a permanent look of incredulity and disbelief.

pyongyang-marathon-cheerThe stewards organized all the runners into position and eventually, at 8.30 am, the starter’s gun reverberated throughout the stadium.  To the cheers of the crowd, the competitors ran about half a lap, exited through the stadium tunnel, emerged back into the light, and appeared in front of  one of the highest monuments in the world, the Arch of Triumph.  Running past the Arch of Triumph, the runners made a sharp right up the road and headed towards the Sino-Korean Friendship Monument, built to commemorate the sacrifices made by the Chinese during the Fatherland Liberation War.  Taking a right at the monument, the 700 or so competitors continued down the long Pyongyang avenue, cheered on by both those spectators lining the streets and those trying to catch a glimpse out of their apartment blocks.  Entering the Chongryu Tunnel, the runners enjoyed a brief respite from the sun that was by this stage growing stronger and, emerging onto the Chongryu Bridge, were met with the incredible view of the largest stadium in the world, the recently refurbished May Day Stadium.

Continuing along the bridge, the runners then took another right onto Juche Tower Street which marked, for everyone, the 5km mark and, for the lucky few, the half way point.  Continuing down Juche Tower Street, the runners were treated to some incredible views of the Taedong River before making a sharp looping right onto Rungna Bridge where more spectators were lined to provide some much needed encouragement and high fives.  pyongyang-marathon-reachTheRungna Tunnel was the scene for the next section of the race and once again, the competitors were thankful for some much needed relief from the elements.  The emergence from the tunnel signaled the final stretch of the lap and a two kilometer run up Sungri Street was met with the welcome site of the Arch of Triumph.  It was at this point that those who ran the 10km race would finish and enjoy a much deserved rest.  Those brave souls who opted for the half marathon and the crazy ones who were fit enough for the full marathon would enjoy one and three more laps respectively, with both groups finishing inside Kim Il Sung Stadium.

At two hours, thirty-nine minutes, the first full marathon runner entered the stadium to huge applause from the audience.  Mads Hey, traveling with Young Pioneer Tours, went onto achieve a personal best time of two hours, forty minutes and what an arena to do it in!

50,000 cheering North Korean spectators carried the young Norwegian to the finish line and for his efforts, later received a standing ovation during the medal ceremony and was awarded with a DPRK-made ceramic vase.

pyongyang-marathon-beginAt 1pm, when the ceremonies were wrapped up, all that was left was for the competitors to reflect on what they had just experienced.  For many, the words would not come and for most of those, they most likely still haven’t.

I’ll be the first to admit that I haven’t done a very good job of describing the marathon and truth be told, I don’t think anyone could.  The correct adjectives do not exist and any description, regardless of how well written or how fantastically elocuted will, in my opinion, always fall well short of the actual feeling of being there and taking part.

Quite simply, you have to run it to believe it.

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24Jul/15

10 Bars To Visit Before You Die

No one lives forever…

(So here are 10 places to party in the meantime)

 

Having recently read an article about the “top 25 places to party before you die”, I was disappointed to see no mention of any of the places my travel firm, Young Pioneer Tours, likes to visit. Yes, we all know that developed countries like the US, and UK have some great bars — but what if your travel tastes lead you off the beaten track? Can you drink in Islamic states? Is there a party scene in North Korea? Can you be drunk in a land that doesn’t exist? Yes, yes and yes — and here’s how:

10. The DMZ Bar, Yangshuo, People’s Republic of China.
9. The Alba Hotel, Caracas, Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela.
8. The Armenian Club, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran.
7. The Cave Bar, Trinidad, Republic of Cuba.
6. The Titanic Hotel, Vank, Nagorno-Karabakh Republic.
5. Ward Number 6 (Palata no 6), Kiev, Ukraine.
4. The Angeles Beach Club (ABC), Pampanga, Republic of the Philippines.
3. The Dining Car, Trans-Mongolian Railway, Russian Federation.
2. The Train Station Bar, Tiraspol, Transnistria (Pridnestrovskaia Moldavskaia Respublica — PMR).
1. The Diplomatic Club, Pyongyang, The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.
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The DMZ BarOK, in the interests of full disclosure, I own this bar, so I admit I’m a tad biased. But let’s look at the facts — Yangshuo is the coolest place in China, and The DMZ Bar is the best bar in Yangshuo. It’s also the only North Korean themed bar on the planet, where you can sip ice-cold imported beer dressed in communist suits, surrounded by unique pictures of the DPRK, enjoying a great atmosphere that feels more like a local pub than anywhere else in China. It’s the place of legends, so pop in and say hello next time you’re in China.
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